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Parasites

Due to their clinical relevance selected parasites have been added to the pathogen search. However, they cannot be inactivated by chemical disinfectants typically used in hospitals.

Pseudomonas aerug.
Clostridium tetani
Herpes simplex
Hepatitis
Influenza
Rotavirus

Pathogen search

Supplemented by the pathogens prioritised by the German Robert Koch-Institute

Which pathogens play a major role in causing infection? Just recently, the Robert Koch-Institute prepared a list of 127 pathogens by ranking them in terms of frequency, spread and burden of disease.  

Considering this prioritisation, we extended our search tool by bacteria, viruses and fungi accordingly. In the list, you will find both the clinically relevant pathogens and the spectrum of effect necessary for disinfectants to inactivate them.

The A-to-Z database includes compact background information on each pathogen: its family, the prevalence, most common infections triggered by it, and, where appropriate, its resistance pattern.

A disinfection procedure’s necessary spectrum of effect is normally determined by the pathogen (e.g. Coxsackievirus). In case you have no data available on the pathogen concerned, this page will serve as guide: For your convenience, the overview also includes the spectrum of activity necessary for disinfectants to kill the respective microorganism (e.g. virucidal for Coxsackiviruses).

Pathogen search supplemented by main transmission paths and recommendations on disinfection.

Clinically relevant pathogens –in alphabetical order

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Acinetobacter baumannii  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Acinetobacter lwoffii  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Acinetobacter spp(incl. MDR)  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Actinomycetes  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Adenovirus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Aeromonas spp.  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Alcaligenes faecalis BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Alcaligenes spp./Achromobacter spp. BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Alcaligenes xylosoxidans (incl. ESBL/MRGN) BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Arbovirus Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Ascaris lumbricoides  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Aspergillus spp.  FungicidalEfficacy against fungi and their spores Fungicidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Yeasticidal activity: efficacy against yeast-like fungi

Fungicidal activity: efficacy against all fungi and their spores

For proving fungicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 13624).

Test organisms for the fungicidal spectrum of activity: Candida albicans and spores of Aspergillus niger (now called Aspergillus brasiliensis)

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their fungicidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Astrovirus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

B

Bacillus anthracis  SporicidalEfficacy against bacterial spores For proving sporicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

To date, the only European test method is designated for the food industry (EN 13704). However, there are several national methods, e.g. in Germany the standard methods of the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM), in France the norms of the Association Française de Normalisation (AFNOR), and in the US the methods of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM).

Test organisms for the sporicidal spectrum of activity:

Spores of Bacillus subtilis; if required, also of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium sporogenes respectively

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Bacillus cereus  SporicidalEfficacy against bacterial spores For proving sporicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

To date, the only European test method is designated for the food industry (EN 13704). However, there are several national methods, e.g. in Germany the standard methods of the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM), in France the norms of the Association Française de Normalisation (AFNOR), and in the US the methods of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM).

Test organisms for the sporicidal spectrum of activity:

Spores of Bacillus subtilis; if required, also of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium sporogenes respectively

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Bacillus subtilis  SporicidalEfficacy against bacterial spores For proving sporicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

To date, the only European test method is designated for the food industry (EN 13704). However, there are several national methods, e.g. in Germany the standard methods of the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM), in France the norms of the Association Française de Normalisation (AFNOR), and in the US the methods of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM).

Test organisms for the sporicidal spectrum of activity:

Spores of Bacillus subtilis; if required, also of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium sporogenes respectively

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Bacteriodes fragilis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Bartonella quintana  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Blastocystis hominis  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Bordetella pertussis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Borrelia burgdorferi  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Borrelia duttoni  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Borrelia recurrentis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Brevundimonas diminuta  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Brevundimonas vesicularis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Brucella spp.  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Burkholderia cepacia (incl. MDR)  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Burkholderia mallei  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Burkholderia pseudomallei  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

C

Campylobacter jejuni / coli  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Candida albicans  YeasticidalEfficacy against yeast-like fungi Fungicidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Yeasticidal activity: efficacy against yeast-like fungi

Fungicidal activity: efficacy against all fungi and their spores

For proving yeasticidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 13624).

Test organism for the yeasticidal spectrum of activity: Candida albicans

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their yeasticidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Candida auris  YeasticidalEfficacy against yeast-like fungi Fungicidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Yeasticidal activity: efficacy against yeast-like fungi

Fungicidal activity: efficacy against all fungi and their spores

For proving yeasticidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 13624).

Test organism for the yeasticidal spectrum of activity: Candida albicans

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their yeasticidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Candida krusei  YeasticidalEfficacy against yeast-like fungi Fungicidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Yeasticidal activity: efficacy against yeast-like fungi

Fungicidal activity: efficacy against all fungi and their spores

For proving yeasticidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 13624).

Test organism for the yeasticidal spectrum of activity: Candida albicans

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their yeasticidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Candida parapsilosis  YeasticidalEfficacy against yeast-like fungi Fungicidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Yeasticidal activity: efficacy against yeast-like fungi

Fungicidal activity: efficacy against all fungi and their spores

For proving yeasticidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 13624).

Test organism for the yeasticidal spectrum of activity: Candida albicans

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their yeasticidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Chlamydia pneumoniae BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Chlamydia psittaci  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Chlamydia trachomatis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Citrobacter spp.  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Clostridium botulinum  SporicidalEfficacy against bacterial spores For proving sporicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

To date, the only European test method is designated for the food industry (EN 13704). However, there are several national methods, e.g. in Germany the standard methods of the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM), in France the norms of the Association Française de Normalisation (AFNOR), and in the US the methods of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM).

Test organisms for the sporicidal spectrum of activity:

Spores of Bacillus subtilis; if required, also of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium sporogenes respectively

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Clostridium difficile  SporicidalEfficacy against bacterial spores For proving sporicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

To date, the only European test method is designated for the food industry (EN 13704). However, there are several national methods, e.g. in Germany the standard methods of the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM), in France the norms of the Association Française de Normalisation (AFNOR), and in the US the methods of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM).

Test organisms for the sporicidal spectrum of activity:

Spores of Bacillus subtilis; if required, also of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium sporogenes respectively

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Clostridium perfringens  SporicidalEfficacy against bacterial spores For proving sporicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

To date, the only European test method is designated for the food industry (EN 13704). However, there are several national methods, e.g. in Germany the standard methods of the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM), in France the norms of the Association Française de Normalisation (AFNOR), and in the US the methods of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM).

Test organisms for the sporicidal spectrum of activity:

Spores of Bacillus subtilis; if required, also of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium sporogenes respectively

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Clostridium tetani  SporicidalEfficacy against bacterial spores For proving sporicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

To date, the only European test method is designated for the food industry (EN 13704). However, there are several national methods, e.g. in Germany the standard methods of the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM), in France the norms of the Association Française de Normalisation (AFNOR), and in the US the methods of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM).

Test organisms for the sporicidal spectrum of activity:

Spores of Bacillus subtilis; if required, also of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium sporogenes respectively

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Coronavirus (incl. SARS- and MERS-CoV) Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Corynebacterium diphtheriae  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Corynebacterium spp.  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Corynebacterium ulcerans  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Coxiella burnetii  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Coxsackievirus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Cryptococcus neoformans  YeasticidalEfficacy against yeast-like fungi Fungicidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Yeasticidal activity: efficacy against yeast-like fungi

Fungicidal activity: efficacy against all fungi and their spores

For proving yeasticidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 13624).

Test organism for the yeasticidal spectrum of activity: Candida albicans

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their yeasticidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Cryptosporidium hominis  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Cryptosporidium parvum  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Cyclospora cayetanensis  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Cytomegalovirus – CMV  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

E

Ebola virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Echinococcus spp.  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Echovirus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Entamoeba dispar  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Entamoeba histolytica  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Enterobacter aerogenes  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Enterobacter cloacae (incl. ESBL/MRGN) BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Enterobius vermicularis  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Enterococcus faecalis (incl. VRE)  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Enterococcus faecium (incl. VRE)  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Enterococcus hirae BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Epidermophyton spp.  FungicidalEfficacy against fungi and their spores Fungicidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Yeasticidal activity: efficacy against yeast-like fungi

Fungicidal activity: efficacy against all fungi and their spores

For proving fungicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 13624).

Test organisms for the fungicidal spectrum of activity: Candida albicans and spores of Aspergillus niger (now called Aspergillus brasiliensis)

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their fungicidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Epstein-Barr virus – EBV  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Escherichia coli 
(incl. EHEC, EPEC, ETEC, EIEC, EAEC, ESBL/MRGN, DAEC)  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

F

Filarial worms  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV)  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Francisella tularensis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

H

Haemophilus influenzae  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Hantavirus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Helicobacter pylori  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Helminths (Worms) Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Hepatitis A virus – HAV  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Hepatitis B virus – HBV  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Hepatitis C virus – HCV  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Hepatitis D virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Hepatitis E virus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Herpes simplex virus – HSV  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Histoplasma capsulatum  FungicidalEfficacy against fungi and their spores Fungicidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Yeasticidal activity: efficacy against yeast-like fungi

Fungicidal activity: efficacy against all fungi and their spores

For proving fungicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 13624).

Test organisms for the fungicidal spectrum of activity: Candida albicans and spores of Aspergillus niger (now called Aspergillus brasiliensis)

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their fungicidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Human enterovirus 71  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7)  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8)  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Human immunodeficiency virus – HIV  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Human metapneumovirus Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Human papillomavirus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Hymenolepsis nana  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

J

K

Klebsiella granulomatis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Klebsiella oxytoca (incl. ESBL/MRGN)  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Klebsiella pneumoniae MDR (incl. ESBL/MRGN)  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

L

Lassa virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Leclercia adecarboxylata  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Legionella pneumophila  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Leishmania spp.  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Leptospira interrogans  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Listeria monocytogenes  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

M

Marburg virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Measles virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Micrococcus luteus  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Microsporum spp.  FungicidalEfficacy against fungi and their spores Fungicidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Yeasticidal activity: efficacy against yeast-like fungi

Fungicidal activity: efficacy against all fungi and their spores

For proving fungicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 13624).

Test organisms for the fungicidal spectrum of activity: Candida albicans and spores of Aspergillus niger (now called Aspergillus brasiliensis)

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their fungicidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Molluscipoxvirus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Morganella spp.  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Mumps virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Mycobacterium chimaera  Mycobactericidal Efficacy against all mycobacteria Mycobactericidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Tuberculocidal activity: efficacy against M. tuberculosis (tested with M. terrae)

Mycobactericidal activity: efficacy against all mycobacteria

For proving mycobactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14348).

Test organisms for the mycobactericidal spectrum of activity:

Mycobacterium terrae and Mycobacterium avium.

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their mycobactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Mycobacterium leprae  Mycobactericidal Efficacy against all mycobacteria Mycobactericidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Tuberculocidal activity: efficacy against M. tuberculosis (tested with M. terrae)

Mycobactericidal activity: efficacy against all mycobacteria

For proving mycobactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14348).

Test organisms for the mycobactericidal spectrum of activity:

Mycobacterium terrae and Mycobacterium avium.

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their mycobactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (incl. MDR)  TuberculocidalEfficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mycobactericidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Tuberculocidal activity: efficacy against M. tuberculosis (tested with M. terrae)

Mycobactericidal activity: efficacy against all mycobacteria

Standards require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension test; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14348).

Test organism for the tuberculocidal spectrum of activity:

Mycobacterium terrae.

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their tuberculocidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Mycoplasma genitalium  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Mycoplasma pneumoniae  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

N

Naegleria fowleri  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Neisseria meningitidis
  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Neisseria gonorrhoeae  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Norovirus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

P

Pantoea agglomerans  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Paracoccus yeei  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Parainfluenza virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Parvovirus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Pediculus humanus capitis  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Pediculus humanus corporis  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Plasmodium spp.  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Pneumocystis jiroveci  FungicidalEfficacy against fungi and their spores Fungicidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Yeasticidal activity: efficacy against yeast-like fungi

Fungicidal activity: efficacy against all fungi and their spores

For proving fungicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 13624).

Test organisms for the fungicidal spectrum of activity: Candida albicans and spores of Aspergillus niger (now called Aspergillus brasiliensis)

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their fungicidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Poliovirus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Polyomavirus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Prevotella spp.  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Prions
Propionibacterium species  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Proteus mirabilis (incl. ESBL/MRGN) BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Proteus vulgaris  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Providencia rettgeri  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Providencia stuartii  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Pseudomonas aeruginosa  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Pseudomonas spp.  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Q

R

Rabies virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Ralstonia spp. BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Respiratory syncytial virus – RSV  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Rhinovirus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Rickettsia prowazekii  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Rickettsia typhi  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Roseomonas gilardii BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Rotavirus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Rubella virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

S

Schistosoma mansoni Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Salmonella enteritidis
  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Salmonella paratyphi  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Salmonella spp.  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Salmonella typhi  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Salmonella typhimurium  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Sarcoptes scabiei (Itch mite) Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Sapovirus  VirucidalEfficacy against viruses For proving virucidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 14476).

Test viruses for the virucidal spectrum of activity:

Poliovirus type 1, adenovirus type 5

In Germany, the guidelines of DVV* and RKI** (in deviation from EN 14476) demand additional proof of efficacy against polyomavirus SV40 and the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus.

Note about chemothermal disinfection procedures

For chemothermal disinfection procedures, European and German standards require efficacy against the nonenveloped parvovirus B19 as proof of virucidal efficacy.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Serratia marcescens (incl. ESBL/MRGN)  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Shigella sonnei  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Sphingomonas species  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Staphylococcus aureus (incl. MRSA, VRSA)  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Staphylococcus capitis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Staphylococcus epidermidis (incl. MRSE)  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Staphylococcus haemolyticus  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Staphylococcus hominis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Staphylococcus lugdunensis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Staphylococcus pasteuri  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Staphylococcus saprophyticus  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Stenotrophomonas maltophilia  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Streptococcus pneumoniae  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Streptococcus pyogenes (incl. PRSP)  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Streptococcus spp.  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Strongyloides stercoralis Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

T

Taenia solium  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

TBE virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Toxoplasma gondii  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Treponema pallidum  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Trichinella spiralis  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Trichomonas vaginalis  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Trichophyton spp.  FungicidalEfficacy against fungi and their spores Fungicidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Yeasticidal activity: efficacy against yeast-like fungi

Fungicidal activity: efficacy against all fungi and their spores

For proving fungicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 13624).

Test organisms for the fungicidal spectrum of activity: Candida albicans and spores of Aspergillus niger (now called Aspergillus brasiliensis)

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their fungicidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Trichosporon spp.  FungicidalEfficacy against fungi and their spores Fungicidal efficacy testing of disinfectants is carried out in stages:

Yeasticidal activity: efficacy against yeast-like fungi

Fungicidal activity: efficacy against all fungi and their spores

For proving fungicidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1, e.g. according to EN 13624).

Test organisms for the fungicidal spectrum of activity: Candida albicans and spores of Aspergillus niger (now called Aspergillus brasiliensis)

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their fungicidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Trichuris trichiura  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Trypanosoma brucei gambiense  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

Trypanosoma cruzi  Specific disinfectants effective against parasites are requiredInactivation of parasites Common disinfectants are not active against the permanent forms of parasites. Most of the organic compounds (e.g. alcohols and formaldehydes) cannot achieve an effect that is sufficient for clinical practice, as they do not adequately penetrate the complex shell.

It is therefore necessary to use disinfectants that are active against parasites (listed by the German Veterinary Medicine Society, DVG) to inactivate parasites and their permanent states. These disinfectants usually are phenol derivatives that are not recommended for daily use in health care due to their toxicological properties.

V

Vaccinia virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Varicella zoster virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Variola virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Vibrio cholerae  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

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Yellow fever virus  Virucidal against enveloped virusesEfficacy against enveloped viruses To date, in accordance with the guidelines of the DVV* and RKI**, a description of the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses only exists in Germany. For efficacy testing, the standards require in-vitro tests.

Test viruses for the virucidal activity against enveloped viruses:

Elstree strain of vaccinia virus and Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)

Both European and national norms require in vitro tests for proving the efficacy (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1).

* German Association for the Control of Virus Diseases
** Robert Koch-Institute

Yersinia enterocolitica   BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Yersinia pestis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

Yersinia pseudotuberculosis  BactericidalEfficacy against bacteria For proving bactericidal efficacy, standards require in vitro tests (quantitative suspension tests; in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 1; e.g. EN 13727).

Test organisms for the bactericidal spectrum of activity include S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, E. hirae

The methods of the European Norms (EN) and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) for testing disinfectants for their bactericidal efficacy are identical to a great extent.

Where applicable and depending on the application area (e.g. instruments, surfaces, etc.), there are practicable test methods available as well (in the EN referred to as phase 2/step 2).

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